Forum Comments

AudioMoth Firmware 1.5.0 & Updates to All Apps
In Announcements
System resonance at 20kHz and other self-noises
In Device Support
Limit of detection?
In Device Support
Justin Halls
Jan 11, 2019
@Barry Moore To give a definitive answer I would need to know a bit more about how you are using the AudioMoth. A measurement of the broadband noise level will give some indication, but that will also depend on the sampling rate (and therefore effective bandwidth) and the AudioMoth gain setting. Noise level will not strictly be proportion to the Nyquist frequency bandwidth because higher frequencies in the microphone and system will be aliased back into the bandwidth of interest. In practical terms, at 192ksps and lo gain, my background noise level (In Audacity waveform, log scale view) is around -50dB which is effectively the dynamic range of the recording. In a power spectrum averaged over half a second, the noise floor drops from -72dB at 1.5kHz to -82dB at 96kHz, but within that there are bands that are noisier, -67dB at 17kHz, -71dB at 36kHz and -75dB at 60kHz with a 'whistle' artefact of -73dB at 75kHz. (Reducing the input gain in the AudioMoth - a hardware mod, should give an increase in dynamic range but I have yet to try it out). On top of all that is the problem of clutter as opposed to noise - i.e. audio signal which is not from your desired target. Walking through long grass produces lots of noise, equipment goes chink, all sorts. Detecting genuine signal is then much more a problem of pattern recognition in a 2-dimensional image (the sonagram) and that is a whole different ballpark. On the other hand sensitivity - i.e. maximum detection range at which you recognise a 'pattern' is also a function of frequency being affected by the microphone frequency response (see the Knowles data sheet) and atmospheric absorption. Basically trying to put numbers to all of these is not wonderfully helpful, but in general the AUdioMoth is comparable to other recorders on the market apart from the more limited dynamic range, and for identification purposes overloading is not a severe problem, although it matters if you want to study signal structure.
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Justin Halls
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